Before You Hit “Send”: The Three Essential Elements of a Successful Query Letter

12:13 pm - by anitamumm

checklistToday I’m gearing up for one of my favorite annual events—the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers Conference this weekend. I love writers conferences in general, but this one is extra special because it’s in my backyard—which means a reunion with lots of friends and colleagues, and a chance to meet writers from Colorado and all over the country. Hooray!

I’ll be giving a workshop about query letters and landing an agent, so I thought this would be a good time to share a snapshot. Here’s the million-dollar question:

WHAT ARE THE THREE INDISPENSABLE, MUST-HAVE ELEMENTS OF A QUERY LETTER? 

Answer:

  • It grabs the reader’s attention in the opening paragraph (and preferably, the very first sentence). A query letter is a single-page, one-shot opportunity to impress an agent. You can’t afford to waste a single line. Whether it’s a provocative tagline or hook, or a reference to a personal connection with the agent (“We met at the RMFW conference last month and you expressed a lot of interest in my contemporary YA novel, XXXX…”), make sure your opening lines pack a punch. As in good fiction writing, don’t get bogged down in background information (“This is my second novel but the first one I’ve submitted. I think I’ve reached the point where I’m ready to take my career to the next level. Blah, blah…”).
  • It shows off your writing style and personality as an author. One of the best ways to show an agent you are a good writer is to give a taste of your writing style right in the query letter. I don’t mean grabbing the first paragraph of your novel (or a random chunk) and plunking it into the opening of your query—that’s hard to pull off and can be a major turnoff. Instead, try to convey a sense of your writing voice—if the novel is funny, sprinkle some of that same humor in the query. If it’s a light-hearted YA, let the agent hear that. If it’s a macabre mystery, give a sense of the darkness and suspense your story contains.
  • It intrigues, amuses, or shocks your readers—makes them want more. The worst thing you can do is try to tell the entire story of your novel. A query letter is a sip that makes the reader want to chug the whole glass. A good way to master this technique is to go to your favorite bookstore or online bookseller and read the back cover copy of novels similar to yours. What is the tone? At what point does the blurb cut you off, leaving you to wonder what’s next? What questions does it plant in your mind as the reader? Try typing up a few of these blurbs on your computer—not to plagiarize, of course, but copying them will help internalize the kind of rhythm and flow that captivates readers.

Want an example of a query that encapsulates all of these elements? Read this story of a successful query from my wonderful colleague and friend, agent Sara Megibow. It’s about her client Stefanie Gaither, whose debut YA novel FALLS THE SHADOW comes out this fall from Simon & Schuster. I’d have to agree with Sara—this query is pitch perfect. 

Need help with your query letter? I offer a double-pass critique (including a look at your second draft once you have revised) for $45. Email your query, or any questions, to anitaedits(at)gmail(dot)com. I look forward to helping you break out of the slush pile!

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6 COMMENTS:

Elissa

That query for FALLS THE SHADOW really is a great example, Anita. It makes me want to go out and get the book. :) I also like how Sara explains what specifically caught her attention. Wish I could make the RMFWC. I've heard it's a great conference, and it's not very far from me here in New Mexico. Maybe next year...

September 5, 2014

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<a href='http://wordcafeblog.wordpress.com' rel='external nofollow ugc' class='url'>Anita Mumm</a>

Thanks, Elissa! Yes, the FALLS THE SHADOW QUERY is one of my favorites to refer authors to. Hope you can make RMFW next year. It was fantastic! It was a sold-out conference at 400 attendees, but it still has that atmosphere of a close, supportive community.

September 8, 2014

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alexiachantel

Helpful post, as usual. And it made me want to use your query critique services. I attempted to email anitedits but received a mailer demon in return. Do I have your gmail correct?

September 8, 2014

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<a href='http://wordcafeblog.wordpress.com' rel='external nofollow ugc' class='url'>Anita Mumm</a>

Hello, Alexia. Thank you for your kind words, and I'd love to do a query critique for you. You alerted me to the fact that I had made a typo in my email address--I'm so sorry about that! I've corrected it now: it's anitaedits(at)gmail.com. I'll look forward to hearing from you.

September 9, 2014

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<a href='http://www.alexiachantel.com' rel='external nofollow ugc' class='url'>Alexia Chantel</a>

Whew! I thought I would have to start shouting for a manual, or an Apple nerd for my Mac. And if that failed, chocolate! Email will be on its way.

September 9, 2014

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<a href='http://wordcafeblog.wordpress.com' rel='external nofollow ugc' class='url'>Anita Mumm</a>

Ha ha! Yes, chocolate is always a good back-up plan. I'm sorry you didn't have to use it. ;-) I look forward to working on your query.

September 10, 2014

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